OpenStreetMap: My Experience

This blog is about my experience with Your Local Neighbourhood on OpenStreetMap – Learn OSM which is available at: http://learnosm.org/en/  or http://learnosm.org/en/ editing/id-editor/.  The specific area chosen for review is Grattan Street Dublin 2 and is available at: https://www.openstreetmap.org/edit#map=18/53.33975/-6.24292

GS Collage croppped

Your Local Neighbourhood on OpenStreetMap (OSM) is an interactive editing site for mapping and it permits anybody to contribute to it. Currently over 500,000 people from various parts of the world who have signed up to OSM. The data on this site can be “copied and re-displayed by anyone who cares to” do so (c/f Wikipedia of Maps).

When I entered the Your Local Neighbourhood on OpenStreetMap website I found that some editing contribution had already been done on the page relating to Grattan Street, Dublin 2. A screen shot of that editing work is visualised in Item 2 below and is available at: https://www.openstreetmap.org/history#map=18/53.33983/-6.24363

best superimposed

The above shows that building numbers 10a to 19 Grattan Street, Dublin 2 are entered. So also entered is the Grattan Street wing of the building named Grattan House the numbers of which are 1 to 6 Grattan Street but the writer did not note the Grattan Street identity. Also not noted was that the Grattan Street wing of Grattan House is occupied by: Irish Dairy Board Limited so I also noted that. From my personal knowledge of Grattan Street I know the buildings that were previously listed on OpenStreetMap as 10a to 19 Grattan are wrongly situated. Thus essentially my contribution to the Your Local Neighbourhood on OpenStreetMap website (for the purpose of this blog) constituted: (i) correcting mistakes previously entered, (ii) adding to the mapping of Grattan Street, Dublin 2, and (iii) providing some historical background.

Contribution and Implications

As stated before the mapped sections in Item 2 identified 10a to 19 Grattan Street are incorrect. First of all 19 is attached to 18 and 20 and currently there is no 13 Grattan Street.  13 Grattan Street was absorbed into 12 Grattan St over 100 years ago. Originally 13 was situated behind 12 Grattan Street because Grattan Street made a right angle turn at 12 Grattan Street and the buildings at one point in history finished at 13.  Moreover 13 Grattan Street was also at times known as “12 and 1/2″ Grattan Street.

Later more buildings were added to Grattan Street and Grattan Street more functionally intersected with Grand Canal Street (Lower), 12 Grattan Street and 14 Grattan Street were directly in line with each other (keeping in mind that at first 13 was situated behind 12 Grattan Street). Thus today 12 Grattan St is followed by 14 Grattan Street.

Item 3 (below) shows the changes I have made to Grattan Street on Your Local Neighbourhood on OpenStreetMap and is available at, https://www.openstreetmap .org/edit#map=18/53.33966/-6.24345.  The amber squares in Item  4 (below) show a history of the changes I made and is available at, https://www.openstreetmap.org/history#map=17/53.33 982/-6.24393

item 4

 

gs my work

Reflection: Learned Experience

In the overall view , by providing a contribution to the Your Local Neighbourhood on OpenStreetMap the exercise has provided me with experience in using and applying the OpenStreetMap tool. Even though I found the mapping activity a bit tedious, the overall experience was inspirational as it placed me on a research platform that extended into web searches that culminated in my finding various archival data websites relating to Grattan Street, Dublin 2.

One such finding was the Dublin City Library and Archive: Electoral Lists 1908 TO 1912, 1915 website available at, http://www.dublinheritage.ie/burgesses/search_new.php?searchtype=street &year=1915&address01=GRATTAN%20STREET   Also noted is that this website shows that in 1915, 12 and 13 Grattan Street were absorbed into a single household. Those details are in Item 5 below. This can be accessed using the url cited above.

item 5

Additionally the Libraries Ireland: Obituary Records Online site shows that in 1862 there were only seven buildings on Grattan Street, Dublin 2 (http://www.libraryireland.com/Dublin-Street-Directory-1862/80.php refers). These numbered 1 to 7 and are visualised on Item 6 below.

item 6

Applicability: Spatial and Crowdsource

The Your Local Neighbourhood on OpenStreetMap takes a crowdsource approach to its development and operation. Put differently, the crowdsource approach is an open data setting that enlists the services of any person who wished to engage in the project.  The benefit is that by engaging in the OpenStreetMap project one gets to be part of the creative process that by virtue of its openness it helps: (i) offset monopoly over information of major organisations, (ii) offset the provision of a service that could otherwise be made costly and could be geared to suit the owner’s objectives, and (iii) at the extreme offset the creation of a tyranny over information. In such circumstances hopefully such an owner would be a beneficial one, but equally such an owner could be self-interested and may create a base of distorted information. The risk (and solutions to same) relating to the crowdsource approach for participants are, as listed in Innovation Management website, mainly three. These are:

Thus although courdsource has its advantages there are also disadvantages – so the key is: in your practices avoid risk at all levels.

Conclusion

For the completion of Blog I have accessed and engaged with Your Local Neighbourhood on OpenStreetMap open source innovative mapping site. The area I chose to map is Grattan Street Dublin 2. While so engaged I noticed that some building on the street were previously incorrectly mapped. I isolated the anomalies and corrected them. In addition by engaging with Your Local Neighbourhood on OpenStreetMap, matters of local history were involved and this resulted in me accessing online library archival data. Thus where information was not original to me references to the sites of authorship were made. Another consideration covered related to areas of risk while participating in and/or engaged with crowdsourcing or open data innovative sites centre on matters of privacy and reputation and these were addressed. I have place this on my blog

 

Bibliography

Dublin City Library and Archive: Electoral Lists 1908 TO 1912, 1915 for “Grattan Street Dublin 2” available at, http://www.dublinheritage.ie/burgesses/search_new.php?currentpage=1&searchtype=advanced&search_name=&search_address=Grattan%20Street&search_startyear=&search_endyearyear=&search_qualification=&search_division_name=&search_ward=

Dublin City Library and Archive: Electoral Lists 1908 TO 1912, 1915 website available at, http://www.dublinheritage.ie/burgesses/search_new.php?searchtype=street &year=1915&address01=GRATTAN%20STREET

Innovation Management: Courdsource available at, http://www.innovationmanagement.se/2013/06/05/crowdsourcing-risk-and-reward-how-to-evaluate-options-for-success/

Your Local Neighbourhood on OpenStreetMap – Learn OSM available at http://learnosm.org/en/editing/id-editor/

Libraries Ireland: Obituary Records Online available at, http://www.libraryireland.com/Dublin-Street-Directory-1862/80.php

“Wikipedia of Maps” in Challenges Google http://www.technologyreview.com/view/426481/wikipedia-of-maps-challenges-google/

 

 

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